Digital Fluency

Written Summation

Digital fluency is an important teaching and learning component in the digital world. It regards the capability to effectively attain desired outcomes via digital technology (Makice, n.d.). It means independently choosing and explaining when to use certain digital technologies to achieve desired results (Ministry of Education, n.d.).

Digital fluency is the highest level of digital technological comprehension and utilisation, and it is expressing purpose and confidence with digital technology utilisation (Wenmoth, 2015, as cited in Core Education, 2015), as seen in Figure 1.

DIGITAL SKILL LEVELS.pngFigure 1. Digital Skill Levels

Within education, it is important for students to develop competent digital fluency levels because it shapes their school achievement levels, and forms the foundation of abilities required in post-formal education (Howell, 2012). Everyone must be able to partake in a digitally-enabled education structure and within a more progressively digitised society (Core Education, 2016), where digital information is the primary means of communication (White, 2013). An educator’s role is to purposely construct pathways from early-childhood to tertiary and post-schooling supporting learners developing their fluency where they understand and are engaged (Core Education, 2016).

Teachers and schools must provide opportunities for learners to be involved in decisions regarding digital technology management and develop pro-social environments of school digital technology use (Netsafe, 2015, as cited in Core Education, 2016). It is crucial that digital fluency is promoted and stimulated within school curriculums and within pedagogical procedures of educational institutes and educators enabling learners to prosper within the new digital age (Ministry of Education, NZ, n.d..).

Within education, it is important for students to develop competent digital fluency levels because it shapes their school achievement levels, and forms the foundation of abilities required in post-formal education (Howell, 2012). Everyone must be able to partake in a digitally-enabled education structure and within a more progressively digitised society (Core Education, 2016), where digital information is the primary means of communication (White, 2013). An educator’s role is to purposely construct pathways from early-childhood to tertiary and post-schooling supporting learners developing their fluency where they understand and are engaged (Core Education, 2016).

Teachers and schools must provide opportunities for learners to be involved in decisions regarding digital technology management and develop pro-social environments of school digital technology use (Netsafe, 2015, as cited in Core Education, 2016). It is crucial that digital fluency is promoted and stimulated within school curriculums and within pedagogical procedures of educational institutes and educators enabling learners to prosper within the new digital age (Ministry of Education, NZ, n.d.).

PRIMARY SCHOOL IPADS.pngFigure 2. Students using iPads

Digital fluency has become crucial for expanding beneficial information communication technology effects, therefore a push has occurred for educational structures to incorporate and implement technology within curriculums (Niessen, 2015); as seen in figure 2 where Australian primary students are engaging with an educational app on an iPad.

It is an essential requirement for educators and schools to teach students the abilities, attributes and approaches required within this digital age (White, 2013).

References

  1. Core Education. (2016). Research and Innovation: Ten Trends 2016: Digital Fluency. Retrieved from https://core-ed.org/research-and-innovation/ten-trends/2016/digital-fluency/
  2. Core Education. (2015). What is Digital Fluency? Retrieved from http://blog.core-ed.org/blog/2015/10/what-is-digital-fluency.htmlCore Education. (2015). Figure 1.
  3. Digital Skill Levels. Retrieved from http://blog.core-ed.org/blog/2015/10/what-is-digital-fluency.html
  4. Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT: Digital Pedagogies for Collaboration and Creativity (1st). Australia: Oxford University Press Australia.
  5. Makice, K. (n.d.). Digital Fluency. Retrieved from https://www.pinterest.com.au/kmakice/digital-fluency/
  6. Ministry of Education, NZ. (n.d.). Digital Fluency. Retrieved from http://elearning.tki.org.nz/Teaching/Digital-fluency
  7. Nice Technology. (2012). Figure 2. Students using iPads. Retrieved from http://nice-technology.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/australian-primary-school-students-will.html
  8. Niessen, S. (2015). What is Digital Fluency? Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283266223_What_is_Digital_Fluency
  9. White, G. (2013). Digital fluency: skills necessary for learning in the digital age. Retrieved from https://research.acer.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1006&context=digital_learning

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